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cannabis

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Derived terms
      • 1.3.2 Translations
    • 1.4 See also
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
      • 2.3.1 Derived terms
      • 2.3.2 Related terms
  • 3 French
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Pronunciation
    • 3.3 Noun
    • 3.4 Further reading
  • 4 Latin
    • 4.1 Etymology 1
      • 4.1.1 Alternative forms
      • 4.1.2 Pronunciation
      • 4.1.3 Noun
        • 4.1.3.1 Declension
        • 4.1.3.2 Derived terms
        • 4.1.3.3 Descendants
    • 4.2 Etymology 2
      • 4.2.1 Pronunciation
      • 4.2.2 Noun
    • 4.3 Etymology 3
      • 4.3.1 Pronunciation
      • 4.3.2 Noun
    • 4.4 References
  • 5 Norman
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Noun
  • 6 Spanish
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Pronunciation
    • 6.3 Noun
      • 6.3.1 See also
  • 7 Swedish
    • 7.1 Etymology
    • 7.2 Noun
      • 7.2.1 Declension

English [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ]

Borrowed from Latin cannabis ( “ hemp ” ) , from Ancient Greek κάνναβις ( kánnabis ) . See there for more. Doublet of canvas and hemp.

Pronunciation [ edit ]

Noun [ edit ]

  1. A tall annual dioecious plant (Cannabis, especially Cannabis sativa), native to central Asia and having alternate, palmately divided leaves and tough bast fibers. Synonyms: hemp , marijuana Hyponyms: Cannabis sativa , Cannabis indica , Cannabis ruderalis
  2. A mildly euphoriant or sedating, intoxicatinghallucinogenic drug prepared from various parts of this plant. Synonyms: bhang , dope , ganja , grass , marijuana , string , THC , weed
  3. The purified and decarboxylated resin of the cannabis plant used for medicinal purposes rather than for any intoxicating effects.
Derived terms [ edit ]
  • cannabidiol
  • cannabinoid
  • cannabinol
Translations [ edit ]

See also [ edit ]

Dutch [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ]

Pronunciation [ edit ]

Noun [ edit ]

  1. cannabis , plant of the genus Cannabis, especially Cannabis sativa or Cannabis indica Synonyms: cannabisplant , hennep , hennepplant , wietplant
  2. cannabis , a drug made from parts of this plant Synonyms: hennep , wiet
Derived terms [ edit ]
  • cannabisgebruiker
  • cannabisolie
  • cannabisplant
  • cannabisproduct
  • cannabist
Related terms [ edit ]
  • canvas
  • hennep

French [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ]

Borrowed from Latin cannabis, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek κάνναβις ( kánnabis ) . Doublet of chanvre.

Pronunciation [ edit ]

  • IPA (key) : /ka.na.bis/

Noun [ edit ]

Further reading [ edit ]

  • “cannabis” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin [ edit ]

Etymology 1 [ edit ]

From Ancient Greek κάνναβις ( kánnabis ) . See there for more.

Alternative forms [ edit ]
  • cannaba , cannabum , cannabus , canapus , canapa , canapis , canva (Late Latin)
Pronunciation [ edit ]
  • ( Classical ) IPA (key) : /ˈkan.na.bis/ , [ˈkan.na.bɪs̠]
  • ( Ecclesiastical ) IPA (key) : /ˈkan.na.bis/
Noun [ edit ]
Declension [ edit ]

Third-declension noun (i-stem, accusative singular in -im, ablative singular in -e or ).

cannabis Contents 1 English 1.1 Etymology 1.2 Pronunciation 1.3 Noun 1.3.1 Derived terms 1.3.2 Translations 1.4 See also 2 Dutch 2.1

Transnational Institute

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Cannabis in Latin America and the Caribbean

Cannabis (or marihuana) is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances in the world. According to the United Nations World Drug Report, 183 million people, or 3.8% of the world’s population, used cannabis in 2014. Its cultivation was also reported by 129 countries. Cannabis is subject to the United Nations System for International Control of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (hereafter “drugs”) and is the most widely consumed of all the drugs. According to that control system, cannabis is among the substances with the strictest legal status; they are the most prohibited, supposedly because of the harm they cause and their lack of medical usefulness.

Nevertheless, its medicinal, spiritual and social use has been recorded in different places and times in human history, without serious associated consequences. Its prohibition began in the early 20th century, even though there were—and are—no records of overdose deaths, and public health risks are relatively low, even compared to other psychoactive substances with less strict legal status, such as alcohol and tobacco.

Transnational Institute Leer esta página en: Cannabis in Latin America and the Caribbean Cannabis (or marihuana) is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances in the world.