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tennessee hemp association

Getting Started

TENNESSEE HEMP HISTORY

GETTING STARTED

2019 HEMP LICENSE

SEED + CLONE ACQUISITION

HEMP PROCESSOR LIST

GROWERS INFORMATION

1. Who can grow industrial hemp, where can it be grown and is there a size or zone requirement?

Anybody can apply to grow industrial hemp except one who has been convicted of a felony for controlled substance in the past 10 years. Anyone who has been issued a hemp license can grow on the approved growing areas indicated on their application. Licensed industrial hemp can be grown anywhere, indoor or outdoor. The research pilot program allows for any size growing area, from large acre lots to small garden sizes. There are no zoning requirements for a hemp license.

2. How do I get an industrial hemp growers and/or processor license?

Applications and registration for an industrial hemp grower license and processor registration must be submitted during the open application period. The next application period will open on November 15th and will close February 15th. Your application must be complete, you must submit an aerial photograph of the growing area and payment. License fees for an industrial hemp growers license is $250-$350 depending on the size of the growing area. There is no fee for processor registration.

3. Do I need to register as a processor?

Maybe, processor registration is required for processing industrial hemp. Processing means to treat or transform harvested industrial hemp from its natural state for distribution in commerce. You do not need to register for personal use only.

4. When are licenses mailed out?

Licenses for industrial hemp growers are mailed on March 1st. Growers are not licensed until they have received a growers license.

5. What does viable and non-viable mean?

Viable hemp is material capable of reproduction including; seeds, seedlings & clones. Non-viable material is not capable of reproduction, which includes stalks, leaves, and flowers.

6. Do you know anyone who can consult with me on how to grow?

The TNHIA is a resource for assistance as well as UT extension offices in your county.

7. Where do I find seeds or seedlings?

Individuals are responsible for sourcing their own propagative material. TNHIA is a great resource. All seed or plant material being brought into the state must have prior approval by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA). Please use our seed and propagule acquisition forms to request approval. If importing from another state use this link: https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/agriculture/documents/planthealth/Domestic_Seed_Import_Requirements.pdf

With your seed or plant acquisition request, you must submit a copy of your industrial hemp growers license, the industrial hemp license for the firm providing the seed and third party test results showing the variety is below the .3%THC threshold. If you want to grow and sell clones, you must provide documentation of permission from the source that allows for replication of those genetics. All seed and clones being brought into the state or leaving the state must be shipped or brought DIRECTLY to the Tennessee Department of agriculture for inventory . Movement permits are required to track the purchase or movement of industrial hemp seed, seedling and clones (viable material).

8. What is the inspection process like?

Every crop grown and every variety may be inspected and sampled by a TDA plant inspector prior to harvest. The grower should contact TDA 30 days prior to harvest for inspection. The license holder is responsible for paying all fees associated with the sample. Each sample is $150. Please keep in mind that the way you set up your production method, may influence the number of samples required to represent the amount of material being produced. Growing multiple varieties will also increase the sampling cost.

9. Can I send off samples to get tested on my own?

Yes and TDA encourages self-monitoring of industrial hemp crops. A google search will give you multiple options. Contact a lawyer for legal advice about sending samples across state lines. Also, please note that 3rd party test results do not replace sampling conducted by TDA.

10. What can I do with my harvested crop?

Viable industrial hemp must only be transferred to a licensed pilot program participant. Non-­viable (not able to develop, grow, or survive) industrial hemp is not regulated by the TDA.

Source: Tennessee Dept of Agriculture Website

Getting Started TENNESSEE HEMP HISTORY GETTING STARTED 2019 HEMP LICENSE SEED + CLONE ACQUISITION HEMP PROCESSOR LIST GROWERS INFOR MAT ION 1. Who can grow industrial hemp,

Tennessee Hemp History

TENNESSEE HEMP HISTORY

GETTING STARTED

2019 HEMP LICENSE

SEED + CLONE ACQUISITION

HEMP PROCESSOR LIST

GROWERS INFORMATION

In response to the 2014 federal Farm Bill, the 108th General Assembly of Tennessee enacted Public Chapter 916

regarding the growing of industrial hemp in Tennessee. The Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture promulgated regulations establishing a program of licensing authorized hemp producers.

Sec. 7606. Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research provides for the cultivation of industrial hemp for purposes of research by institutions of higher education or state departments of agriculture in states where it is legal. In May of 2016, state law was amended to allow for a processor license.

Industrial hemp is federally defined in the Agricultural Act of 2014 as “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration of not more than 0.3% on a dry weight basis.” However, industrial hemp also produces CBD, and there is no restriction on CBD concentration.

Tennessee’s Rich History with Industrial Hemp

Hemp has been an important crop throughout the history of the U.S., and to a certain extent in Tennessee.

By the mid-1600s, hemp had become an important part of the Colonial economy and was used to produce cordage, cloth, canvas, sacks and paper. In fact, the first drafts of the Declaration of Independence were penned on hemp paper. Hemp was widely grown in Revolutionary War times, as it was strategically important for maritime use for lines, rigging, sail canvas and caulking on ships. George Washington encouraged hemp production and Thomas Jefferson bred improved varieties and invented a special brake for crushing the plant’s stems during fiber processing.

The history of hemp production Tennessee dates to the early 19th century with the arrival of pioneer families. Donald Winters, in his Tennessee Farming, quotes an East Tennessee report from the 1840s: “Hemp grows luxuriantly upon our River Bottom Lands, but has hitherto been neglected; although it is believed to be more profitable than any other crop that can be raised.” Winters writes that during the War with Mexico, the state legislature petitioned the U.S. government to help promote hemp production in Tennessee. In 1852 the Navy built a rope factory in Memphis with the intention of purchasing hemp from Tennessee and Kentucky growers, but the project was eventually abandoned.

According to the 1850 U.S. Census, Tennessee produced 454 tons of dew-rotted hemp and 141 tons of water-rotted hemp. The different methods refer to the way in which the components of the stalk were broken down and prepared for processing.

Tennessee’s first commissioner of agriculture, Joseph Killebrew, in his exhaustive Resources of Tennessee published in 1874, reported that hemp was widely grown throughout Middle Tennessee. Bedford, Coffee, Jackson, Marshall, Maury, Sumner and Williamson counties were particularly noted for having suitable soils for hemp production. In Maury County, hemp was used for ropes and bagging for cotton. “In response to this demand, hemp came to be one of the staple crops in Maury County, and rope walks and hemp factories were quite as common in the county as cotton gins are now,” according to the report. In the 1870 census, Sumner County (including present day Trousdale County) reported producing 150 tons of hemp. “In time, however, Missouri, Kentucky and other states entered the hemp field, and the competition became too strong,” Killebrew added.

Along with Missouri and Illinois, Kentucky farmers produced most American hemp until the late 1800s, when demand for sailcloth and cordage began to wane due to the arrival of steam ships. With the advent of mechanical means of harvesting and processing, Kentucky continued to lead in seed production and Wisconsin in fiber processing before and during World War II, when there was a brief resurgence in demand.

Although industrial hemp contains very little of the hallucinogenic properties of marijuana, production and processing declined after World War II with the passage of state and federal laws aimed at regulating the narcotic varieties of Cannabis. Its decline was further accelerated with the development and availability of cheap synthetic fibers. Also, the resurgence of cotton production in the deep South was likely a contributing factor to hemp’s decline.

Source: Except where otherwise noted, this information is based on “The Forgotten History of Hemp Cultivation in America” by Oscar H. Will III, November 2004

Tennessee Hemp History TENNESSEE HEMP HISTORY GETTING STARTED 2019 HEMP LICENSE SEED + CLONE ACQUISITION HEMP PROCESSOR LIST GROWERS INFOR MAT ION In response to the 2014