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Industrial hemp becomes legal in South Dakota after Noem signs bill

A volunteer walks through a hemp field at a farm in Springfield, Colo. on Oct. 5, 2013, during the first known harvest of industrial hemp in the U.S. since the 1950s. (Photo: P. Solomon Banda/AP Photo)

Industrial hemp and CBD oil are now legal in South Dakota after a yearlong standoff between Gov. Kristi Noem and legislators.

Noem signed House Bill 1008 into law on Friday, and it goes goes into effect immediately. The bill includes $3.5 million in funding to set up the state’s industrial hemp program, though funding is subject to change as Noem has called for a special session in June to address the budget in the wake of the coronavirus.

Producers must wait to grow hemp until the U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved South Dakota’s hemp program, which legislators estimated could occur as late as June.

Noem and legislators said the industrial hemp bill would be passed within the first couple of weeks of the 2020 legislative session, but it was instead the last bill passed in the Legislature after it was used in negotiations on other bills throughout the final week.

The passage into law comes a year after Noem and legislators began their dispute over legalizing hemp. Legislators passed the bill in 2019 despite Noem’s calls to wait until the state was ready for it, but then they were unable to override Noem’s veto of the 2019 hemp bill. Legislators then spent the interim studying the issue to ready a bill for the 2020 session, but Noem continued to say she opposed hemp, writing in a Wall Street Journal column in September that she planned to veto the bill in the 2020 session.

Industrial hemp has become legal in South Dakota after a yearlong standoff between Gov. Kristi Noem and legislators.

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Malicious cyber activity threatens the public’s safety and our national and economic security. The FBI’s cyber strategy is to impose risk and consequences on cyber adversaries. Our goal is to change the behavior of criminals and nation-states who believe they can compromise U.S. networks, steal financial and intellectual property, and put critical infrastructure at risk without facing risk themselves. To do this, we use our unique mix of authorities, capabilities, and partnerships to impose consequences against our cyber adversaries.

The FBI is the lead federal agency for investigating cyber attacks and intrusions. We collect and share intelligence and engage with victims while working to unmask those committing malicious cyber activities, wherever they are.

Learn more about what you can do to protect yourself from cyber criminals, how you can report cyber crime, and the Bureau’s efforts in combating the evolving cyber threat.

What You Should Know

Protect Yourself

  • Taking the right security measures and being alert and aware when connected are key ways to prevent cyber intrusions and online crimes. Learn how to protect your computer, network, and personal information.

Understand Common Crimes and Risks Online

  • Business e-mail compromise (BEC) scams exploit the fact that so many of us rely on e-mail to conduct business—both personal and professional—and it’s one of the most financially damaging online crimes.
  • Identity theft happens when someone steals your personal information, like your Social Security number, and uses it to commit theft or fraud.
  • Ransomware is a type of malicious software, or malware, that prevents you from accessing your computer files, systems, or networks and demands you pay a ransom for their return.
  • Spoofing and phishing are schemes aimed at tricking you into providing sensitive information to scammers.
  • Online predators are a growing threat to young people.
  • More common crimes and scams

Respond and Report

File a Report with the Internet Crime Complaint Center

If you are the victim of online or internet-enabled crime, file a report with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) as soon as possible. Crime reports are used for investigative and intelligence purposes. Rapid reporting can also help support the recovery of lost funds. Visit ic3.gov for more information, including tips and information about current crime trends.

Contact Your FBI Field Office

If you or your organization is the victim of a network intrusion, data breach, or ransomware attack, contact your nearest FBI field office or report it at tips.fbi.gov.

Combating the Evolving Cyber Threat

Our adversaries look to exploit gaps in our intelligence and information security networks. The FBI is committed to working with our federal counterparts, our foreign partners, and the private sector to close those gaps.

These partnerships allow us to defend networks, attribute malicious activity, sanction bad behavior, and take the fight to our adversaries overseas. The FBI fosters this team approach through unique hubs where government, industry, and academia form long-term trusted relationships to combine efforts against cyber threats.

Within government, that hub is the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force (NCIJTF). The FBI leads this task force of more than 30 co-located agencies from the Intelligence Community and law enforcement. The NCIJTF is organized around mission centers based on key cyber threat areas and led by senior executives from partner agencies. Through these mission centers, operations and intelligence are integrated for maximum impact against U.S. adversaries.

Only together can we achieve safety, security, and confidence in a digitally connected world.

How We Work

Whether through developing innovative investigative techniques, using cutting-edge analytic tools, or forging new partnerships in our communities, the FBI continues to adapt to meet the challenges posed by the evolving cyber threat.

  • The FBI has specially trained cyber squads in each of our 56 field offices, working hand-in-hand with interagency task force partners.
  • The rapid-response Cyber Action Team can deploy across the country within hours to respond to major incidents.
  • With cyber assistant legal attachés in embassies across the globe, the FBI works closely with our international counterparts to seek justice for victims of malicious cyber activity.
  • The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) collects reports of Internet crime from the public. Using such complaints, the IC3’s Recovery Asset Team has assisted in freezing hundreds of thousands of dollars for victims of cyber crime.
  • CyWatch is the FBI’s 24/7 operations center and watch floor, providing around-the-clock support to track incidents and communicate with field offices across the country.

The FBI Cyber Strategy

The FBI’s cyber strategy is to impose risk and consequences on cyber adversaries through our unique authorities, our world-class capabilities, and our enduring partnerships. Learn more (pdf)

Partnerships

National Defense Cyber Alliance (NDCA)

The NDCA brings together experts from the U.S. government and cleared defense contractors to share threat intelligence in real time, with the goal of improving the network security of NDCA member organizations and gaining a greater understanding of the cyber threat landscape.

National Cyber Forensics & Training Alliance (NCFTA)

Because of the global reach of cyber crime, no single organization, agency, or country can defend against it. Vital partnerships like the NCFTA have become an international model for bringing together law enforcement, private industry, and academia to build and share resources, strategic information, and threat intelligence to identify and stop emerging cyber threats and mitigate existing ones.

The FBI is the lead federal agency for investigating cyber attacks by criminals, overseas adversaries, and terrorists. The threat is incredibly serious—and growing. ]]>